Education, College Women and Suffrage: International Perspectives Conference 13-14 June 2018

Wellesley group in Suffrage parade in Philadelphia ,1915
Suffrage Parade (© Trustees for Wellesley College). Students march for suffrage in Philadelphia (1915),  College Women Open Access Portal: Documenting the History of Women in Higher Education

Calling all Researchers, Lecturers, School Teachers, Archivists, Curators, and Heritage Professionals with interests in education and suffrage!  As a result of generous funding from the History of Education Society, we have extended our Call For Papers deadline and are now able to offer student bursaries (see below for details).  We are also currently exploring options to help support individual or group presentations by Teachers.  So do get get writing and send your proposals to Conference Administrator  Alexandra.Hughes-Johnson.2013@live.rhul.ac.uk by Monday 27th November.  Our conference website will be going live very soon, but if you have any questions or concerns please contact Alex, or Bedford Centre co-Director Nicola Phillips, we are happy to help.

We are also delighted to announce that our Keynote Speakers will be:

Eric Pumroy, Director of Special Collections & the Albert M. Greenfield Digital Centre for the History Of Women’s Education (Bryn Mawr, USA) and former Director Jennifer Redmond, (Maynooth University, Ireland) who will speak about education, suffrage and their work on the Seven Sisters’ College Women: Documenting the History of Women in Higher Education portal.

Kay Whitehead, Professor of Education, (Flinders University, Australia) who will give a presentation on transnational teacher education and suffrage in Australia and Britain.

As part of  a Royal Holloway college wide series of events to commemorate suffrage at Royal Holloway in 2018, the Bedford Centre for the History of Women  teamed up with Winchester’s Centre for the History of Women’s Education to organise this international, interdisciplinary conference exploring the links between education and suffrage campaigns and the roles of college women in them.  The idea grew out of the Bedford Centre’s new project to digitise Bedford and Royal Holloway college student archive documents relating to suffrage (so watch this space for more about this fascinating new material!), which will be launched at the conference. Which is why we also want to highlight the existence and educational uses of similar material, textual and digital collections around the world.

We are running the conference over 13-14th June to commemorate the funeral of Royal Holloway Alumna Emily Wilding Davison after whom our stunning new library, which opened this month has been named.  Fellow RHUL alumnae attended her funeral procession, including Rose Lamartine Yates who was the first guard of honour to Emily Wilding Davison’s coffin.  She is pictured below, having tea with friends in her college room.

Rose Lamartine Yates in Study

Rose Lamartine Yates (bottom left) with friends in her study at Royal Holloway c. 1900.    RHC PH/271/3  [Copyright Royal Holloway Archives]

CALL FOR PAPERS

Pioneers of women’s higher or further education in different countries both supported and distanced themselves from contemporary suffrage campaigns for a range of reasons. Women who had benefitted from a college education that had introduced them to ideas of equality, democracy and citizenship also joined both sides of the suffrage debate as evidenced in letters, diaries, newspaper reports and other ephemera. The debates took place within nations and on the international stage, and college women travelled extensively in their private and professional lives exchanging views through their correspondence and in their memories.

The conference will provide a forum for those involved in teaching and researching suffrage and the history of women’s education (in schools, HE and heritage institutions) to discuss new directions. We invite submissions in a range of formats by archivists, public historians, researchers, curators and teachers to explore and discuss the under-researched links between education and suffrage.  Presentations may draw on a range of sources as they relate to the intersection of education and suffrage, including the use and interpretation of digital archives and material sources for research or educational purposes.

Proposals of c. 300 words are welcome for 10 or 20 minute individual presentations, or for workshops, panels, symposia, or posters on the themes of (but not limited to):

Histories
College Women’s engagement with suffrage or anti-suffrage
Institutional attitudes and responses to suffrage
Alumnae networks, Associations and suffrage
College Women’s inter/trans-national suffrage connections

Heritage
Oral histories of education and suffrage
School and College magazines
Public Histories of suffrage and education
Educational archives and suffrage
Memorialising suffrage and college heritage

Teaching and Learning
Citizenship, Education and Suffrage
Education and Suffrage in film, music, drama and fiction
Using and accessing digital archives of education and suffrage
Teaching suffrage beyond national boundaries
Creating innovative suffrage resources & activities

Student Bursaries:  To apply please send your 300 wd proposal, plus a 1 page CV and supporting letter from your Supervisor or Lecturer.

The conference organisers very much look forward to hearing from you and welcoming you to Royal Holloway’s historic campus,

Dr Nicola Phillips and Dr Alex Windscheffel (Royal Holloway, University of London), Prof. Stephanie Spencer and Prof Joyce Goodman (University of Winchester)

 

 

 

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The First Women in Law:

Normanton and Heilbron

In 1949 Helena Normanton and Rose Heilbron, became the first female King’s Counsel     [image: The Guardian]

Celebrating the past to shape the future of women in law

Thursday 4th May, 6.30-8.30pm at Royal Holloway, University of London

2019 will mark 100 years since of the passing of the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act which removed any barrier to women working as lawyers on the grounds of their sex.  To celebrate this forthcoming anniversary the Bedford Centre has teamed up with the First 100 Years to run a public panel event and discussion at Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham, Surrey.  We are delighted to welcome three exciting speakers: Dana Denis Smith (First 100 Years), Dr Judith Bourne (Lecturer at St Mary’s University, Twickenham) and Charlotte Coleman,  an alumna of Royal Holloway’s Public History MA whose work on how female lawyers in the past can inspire the next generation you can see and hear at Women in Law: Inspired and Inspirations. All three will explore the  legal and social challenges women faced to become lawyers at the turn of the last century and to highlight how much women have achieved and how history can help ins51hoN4FCT6L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_pire and shape the future of women entering the profession now.  Professor Rosie Meek (Head of Royal Holloway’s School of Law) will introduce the event which will be followed by a reception and book signing by Judith Bourne to mark the publication of her new book, Helena Normanton and the Opening of the Bar to Women. We will also celebrate the achievements of Mary Sykes, who graduated from Royal Holloway College in 1917.  In November 1922 women were permitted to sit the Solicitors’ Final Exam, which she passed with honours, and in 1923 she become one of the first female solicitors in England and Wales.

This free public event is open to all, but we are extending an especially warm invitation to Royal Holloway and Bedford College alumnae who have gone on to work in law and any college or 6th Form students who might be considering a legal career.  There will also be refreshments and an opportunity to talk to the panellists, so do join us for what promises to be an enjoyable evening and engaging discussion.  To reserve a place please go to https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-first-women-lawyers-tickets-32973122497

We would also welcome any comments relating to this topic and to the event itself so do let us know your thoughts and experiences.

 

 

 

 

‘Mary Toft’s Monstrous Births of 1726: Then and Now’

mary-toft

William Hogarth, ‘Cunucularii or the wise men of Godlimen in consultation’ (1726) Wellcome Library no. 17342i

The Annual Bedford Centre Lecture 2017

By Professor Karen Harvey, University of Sheffield

Thursday 2nd February, 6-8pm Moore Building Auditorium

at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey

Click here to listen to a podcast of the lecture and view Karen slides

It is also available on our Podcast Resources page

In 1726 Mary Toft gave birth to seventeen rabbits or parts of rabbits in Godalming, Surrey. Toft had looked at the animals during her pregnancy and their image was imprinted on her foetus. Based on new research, Karen’s engaging presentation explores why so many contemporaries, including eminent male Physicians, believed in the hoax.  Many portrayed Toft as a devious woman who set out to hoodwink the doctors and make her fortune, yet this lecture offers other explanations for the extraordinary actions of Toft and her family.  It also explores the social, physical and emotional experiences Toft underwent in the contexts of the work of contemporary midwives, gynaecologists and reproductive medicine.

The Bedford Centre is particularly delighted to welcome back Karen Harvey, who is a Royal Holloway alumna and started her career as a student on the MA in Women’s and Gender History.

Karen is now a Professor of Cultural History at the University of Sheffield and her numerous publications include The Little Republic: Masculinity and Domestic Authority in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Oxford University Press, 2012) which is Open Access and available to read online, and Reading Sex in the Eighteenth Century: Bodies and Gender in English Erotic Culture (Cambridge University Press, January 2004).  Karen works on material culture and is committed to the public understanding of History and the past. She has been Academic in Residence at Bank Street Arts, in Sheffield, since 2012.

This engaging public lecture is free (no booking required) and everyone is  warmly invited to to join us for a wine reception afterwards.  We look forward to seeing you there!